Concrete Wall Crack Repair Grand Prairie TX

Grand Prairie House Leveling Services Foundation Repair Proudly Servicing Dallas County

Grand Prairie House Leveling Services Foundation Repair is your number one foundation repair Directory and foundation repair contractor network in the Grand Prairie area. Experts efficiently handle all types of foundation issues so that you can return to normal life activities as quickly as possible. No foundations are out of our reach. Advanced technology is used creating solutions to solve every unwanted foundation problem you may have.

Grand Prairie House Leveling Services Foundation Repair

will develop a customized service plan to contain and control foundations in your home. Below lists some services and areas of expertise:

  • Concrete Lifting and Leveling
  • Settlement Sinking
  • Sagging Crawl Space
  • Floor Cracks
  • Uneven Floors
  • Sticking Windows and Doors
  • Tilting Chimneys
  • Foundation Pier Systems
  • Helical Deck Piers
  • Crawl Space Support Posts

Grand Prairie House Leveling Services’s foundation service network helps you find professionals located in Grand Prairie, TX. It has been family owned and operated for years where it has grown into a diverse selection of Foundation Repair experts. Pros will provide complete foundation repair service no matter how complex.


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Grand Prairie Foundation Repair

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Foundation Repair
Phone: 1-817-222-9253
9388 Marshall Street, Grand Prairie, TX 75050

Available services for Foundation Repair in Grand Prairie TX

Grand Prairie House Leveling Services’s Foundation Repair Service specializes is a providing all foundation care needs. You will be treated like family, so you can take pride in striving to get the best service imaginable at a fair price.

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Properties of concrete

Concrete has relatively high compressive strength, but significantly lower tensile strength. As a result,[further explanation needed] without compensating, concrete would almost always fail from tensile stresses – even when loaded in compression. The practical implication of this is that concrete elements subjected to tensile stresses must be reinforced with materials that are strong in tension (often steel). The elasticity of concrete is relatively constant at low stress levels but starts decreasing at higher stress levels as matrix cracking develops. Concrete has a very low coefficient of thermal expansion, and as it matures concrete shrinks. All concrete structures will crack to some extent, due to shrinkage and tension. Concrete which is subjected to long-duration forces is prone to creep. The density of concrete varies, but is around 2,400 kilograms per cubic metre (150 lb/cu ft).[1]

Reinforced concrete is the most common form of concrete. The reinforcement is often steel, rebar (mesh, spiral, bars and other forms). Structural fibers of various materials are available. Concrete can also be prestressed (reducing tensile stress) using internal steel cables (tendons), allowing for beams or slabs with a longer span than is practical with reinforced concrete alone. Inspection of existing concrete structures can be non-destructive if carried out with equipment such as a Schmidt hammer, which is sometimes used to estimate relative concrete strengths in the field.

The ultimate strength of concrete is influenced by the water-cementitious ratio (w/cm), the design constituents, and the mixing, placement and curing methods employed. All things being equal, concrete with a lower water-cement (cementitious) ratio makes a stronger concrete than that with a higher ratio. The total quantity of cementitious materials (portland cement, slag cement, pozzolans) can affect strength, water demand, shrinkage, abrasion resistance and density. All concrete will crack independent of whether or not it has sufficient compressive strength. In fact, high Portland cement content mixtures can actually crack more readily due to increased hydration rate. As concrete transforms from its plastic state, hydrating to a solid, the material undergoes shrinkage. Plastic shrinkage cracks can occur soon after placement but if the evaporation rate is high they often can actually occur during finishing operations, for example in hot weather or a breezy day. In very high-strength concrete mixtures (greater than 70 MPa) the crushing strength of the aggregate can be a limiting factor to the ultimate compressive strength. In lean concretes (with a high water-cement ratio) the crushing strength of the aggregates is not so significant. The internal forces in common shapes of structure, such as arches, vaults, columns and walls are predominantly compressive forces, with floors and pavements subjected to tensile forces. Compressive strength is widely used for specification requirement and quality control of concrete. Engineers know their target tensile (flexural) requirements and will express these in terms of compressive strength.

Wired.com reported on April 13, 2007 that a team from the University of Tehran, competing in a contest sponsored by the American Concrete Institute, demonstrated several blocks of concretes with abnormally high compressive strengths between 340 and 410 MPa (49,000 and 59,000 psi) at 28 days.[2] The blocks appeared to use an aggregate of steel fibres and quartz – a mineral with a compressive strength of 1100 MPa, much higher than typical high-strength aggregates such as granite (100–140 MPa or 15,000–20,000 psi). Reactive Powder Concrete, also known as Ultra-High Performance Concrete, can be even stronger, with strengths of up to 800 MPa (116,000 PSI).[3] These are made by eliminating large aggregate completely, carefully controlling the size of the fine aggregates to ensure the best possible packing, and incorporating steel fibers (sometimes produced by grinding steel wool) into the matrix. Reactive Powder Concretes may also make use of silica fume as a fine aggregate. Commercial Reactive Powder Concretes are available in the 17–21 MPa (2,500–3,000 psi) strength range.

The modulus of elasticity of concrete is a function of the modulus of elasticity of the aggregates and the cement matrix and their relative proportions. The modulus of elasticity of concrete is relatively constant at low stress levels but starts decreasing at higher stress levels as matrix cracking develops. The elastic modulus of the hardened paste may be in the order of 10-30 GPa and aggregates about 45 to 85 GPa. The concrete composite is then in the range of 30 to 50 GPa.

This equation is completely empirical and is not based on theory. Note that the value of Ec found is in units of psi. For normal weight concrete (defined as concrete with a wc of 150 lb/ft3 and subtracting 5 lb/ft3 for steel) Ec is permitted to be taken as 57000fc′{displaystyle 57000{sqrt {f'_{c}}}}.

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